9 JOHN MUIR QUOTES TO LIVE BY
To Be Mind­ful“When we try to pick out any­thing by itself, we find it hitched to every­thing else in the Uni­verse.” - My First Sum­mer in the Sierra , 1911
To Learn“I am los­ing pre­cious days. I am degen­er­at­ing into a machine for mak­ing money.I am learn­ing noth­ing in this triv­ial world of men. I must break away and get out into the moun­tains to learn the news.” - Alaska Days with John Muir by Samuel Hall Young 
To Fight“The bat­tle we have fought, and are still fight­ing for the forests is a part of the eter­nal con­flict between right and wrong, and we can­not expect to see the end of it. …So we must count on watch­ing and striv­ing for these trees, and should always be glad to find any­thing so surely good and noble to strive for.” - The National Parks and For­est Reser­va­tions” in a speech pub­lished in the Sierra Club Bul­letin, 1896
To Con­sider“How many hearts with warm red blood in them are beat­ing under cover of the woods, and how many teeth and eyes are shin­ing! A mul­ti­tude of ani­mal peo­ple, inti­mately related to us, but of whose lives we know almost noth­ing, are as busy about their own affairs as we are about ours.” - Our National Parks, 1901
To Return Home“Thou­sands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized peo­ple are begin­ning to find out that going to the moun­tains is going home; that wild­ness is a neces­sity; and that moun­tain parks and reser­va­tions are use­ful not only as foun­tains of tim­ber and irri­gat­ing rivers, but as foun­tains of life.” - Our National Parks, 1901
To Lis­ten“When one is alone at night in the depths of these woods, the still­ness is at once awful and sub­lime. Every leaf seems to speak.” - John of the Moun­tains: The Unpub­lished Jour­nals of John Muir, 1938
To Breathe“Another glo­ri­ous day, the air as deli­cious to the lungs as nec­tar to the tongue.”  - My First Sum­mer in the Sierra , 1911
To See“The wrongs done to trees, wrongs of every sort, are done in the dark­ness of igno­rance and unbe­lief, for when the light comes, the heart of the peo­ple is always right.” - John of the Moun­tains: The Unpub­lished Jour­nals of John Muir, 1938
(via The Clymb)

9 JOHN MUIR QUOTES TO LIVE BY

To Be Mind­ful
“When we try to pick out any­thing by itself, 
we find it hitched to every­thing else in the Uni­verse.” 
- My First Sum­mer in the Sierra , 1911

To Learn
“I am los­ing pre­cious days. I am degen­er­at­ing into a machine for mak­ing money.
I am learn­ing noth­ing in this triv­ial world of men. I must break away and get out into the moun­tains to learn the news.” 
- Alaska Days with John Muir by Samuel Hall Young 

To Fight
“The bat­tle we have fought, and are still fight­ing for the forests is a part of the eter­nal con­flict between right and wrong, and we can­not expect to see the end of it. …So we must count on watch­ing and striv­ing for these trees, and should always be glad to find any­thing so surely good and noble to strive for.” 
- The National Parks and For­est Reser­va­tions” 
in a speech pub­lished in the Sierra Club Bul­letin, 1896

To Con­sider
“How many hearts with warm red blood in them are beat­ing under cover of the woods, and how many teeth and eyes are shin­ing! A mul­ti­tude of ani­mal peo­ple, inti­mately related to us, but of whose lives we know almost noth­ing, are as busy about their own affairs as we are about ours.” 
- Our National Parks, 1901

To Return Home
“Thou­sands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized peo­ple are begin­ning to find out that going to the moun­tains is going home; that wild­ness is a neces­sity; and that moun­tain parks and reser­va­tions are use­ful not only as foun­tains of tim­ber and irri­gat­ing rivers, but as foun­tains of life.” 
- Our National Parks, 1901

To Lis­ten
“When one is alone at night in the depths of these woods, the still­ness is at once awful and sub­lime. Every leaf seems to speak.” 
- John of the Moun­tains: The Unpub­lished Jour­nals of John Muir1938

To Breathe
“Another glo­ri­ous day, the air as deli­cious to the lungs as nec­tar to the tongue.”  
- My First Sum­mer in the Sierra , 1911

To See
“The wrongs done to trees, wrongs of every sort, are done in the dark­ness of igno­rance and unbe­lief, for when the light comes, the heart of the peo­ple is always right.” 
- John of the Moun­tains: The Unpub­lished Jour­nals of John Muir, 1938

(via The Clymb)

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
Zoom Info
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
Zoom Info
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
Zoom Info
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
Zoom Info

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 

[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!

The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?

Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.

Read the full article by Ethan Siegel

Your first kiss isn’t as important as your last. The math test really didn’t matter. The pie really did. The stuff you’re good at and the stuff you’re bad at are just different parts of the same thing. Same goes for the people you love and the people you don’t—and the people who love you and the people who don’t. The only thing that mattered was that you cared about a few people. Life is really, really short.

Ethan Wate (Beautiful Chaos)

theimpossiblecool:

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”
Hunter S. Thompson

theimpossiblecool:

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”

Hunter S. Thompson